Durham, Durham

How to Successfully Navigate Your Way Through Induction Week at University (In 10 Tips)

img_3771It’s beautiful, here in Durham. The leaves are changing with my favorite season, the air hasn’t cooled yet to layer-the-f-up temperatures, and the increasing student population is still energetic with their new life at university.

Induction week is the first week for “freshers”, the first-year students arriving, finding their colleges and dorms, exploring the campus, and going to socials, workshops and seminars put on by the university to help ease students into their new home and schedules. And let me tell you–it’s confusing and manic as hell.

First and foremost, before we go on, I’m coming at this from a slightly more unique perspective in that I’m counted as a “mature” (30-year-old) student, and I’m American, so I’m somewhat foreign. While some of this is probably just obvious for the more technologically inclined who are hip to the jive of app-lingo and the whatnot, for others, it can be overwhelming.

So here’s what I learned with my Induction week at Durham University:

  1. Know Your Housing and Travel Routes
    For me, I was in the process of moving, and I didn’t have the luxury of affording on-campus housing. And because of my age, I opted out of student housing as well. I’m sure there are some wonderful 18-year-olds who were born during the time I was going through puberty, but I don’t really want to hold their hand as they learn the responsibilities of taking the trash out, cleaning their dishes, throwing rotten food out, and so on.
    So much did I not want to be in this situation (no offense, freshers, I promise when you get to my age you’ll get it), that I actually found myself housed in the next county down in North Yorkshire, in a place i couldn’t be happier with. However, it means about a 45 minute commute to and from university every day. Because of this, I was picky about what events I went to during Induction.
    What’s more, I had to know my route in advance, know how much time it was going to take, and then also prepare for parking. That was the hardest part. I am still figuring that part out. But as far as I can tell, Park and Ride might be my cheapest option, especially with the option of a student discount on a bus pass (hopefully).
  2. Get on a Computer
    There is so much going on during Induction week. As I mentioned before, I had to pick and choose which events were worth me going to. However, because I had just moved, I hadn’t set up my internet yet. As a result, like most people with smart phones, it became my main source of keeping up with what was going on.
    Except my phone alone wasn’t good enough. I found there were several apps that I needed in order to access the information I needed, and they certainly have some problems. Whereas what I was looking for and trying to do would only take minutes on a computer, it was taking me near an hour per task. What’s more, I found out there was a student email that the university was using that I hadn’t even set up yet, and so I was missing a fair deal.
    Phones are handy and wonderful things, but they’re not the be all and end all. You need to get online one a real computer–not a tablet or iPad, but an actual computer, from time to time.
  3. Get a Planner Before You Arrive
    Again, there is an insane amount going on during Induction week. And I know, I know, you already are getting a planner to deal with all your classes and blah, blah, blah. I held out, and was waiting for my perfect planner to show itself, and thus was slacking during Induction week. But trust me, you want a planner.
    Because I was trying to go for the minimum, I actually missed quite a few things that I wish I had gone to, such as a studies skills seminar, a library resource tour, and so on. I didn’t know I wanted to go to them until I’d missed them and arrived on campus at a complete loss as to where to go for what.
  4. Go to Your College
    I plan on having very little to do with my college. Not out of lack of pride or anything, but because I just don’t have time to do anything there. I’m not living there, I’m not young enough to be there, and I’m working and living on a farm 30 miles south of here. However, as I learned the hard way, it is important to still show your face there from time to time.
    They are there to support you, and to help you navigate your way around university, student life, and tools you might need. Also, if you haven’t told the you’re not actually living there, they will assume you are, and then lecture you for ten minutes when you go to get your verification of registration so that you can get your student ID (no seriously, it doesn’t matter your age, they will sternly talk down to you when they are upset, like you are nine years old and flushed a frog down the toilet and now they have to pay for a plumber).
    Please the college administration, and just show up, talk to them, and find out what you need to get in order. In fact, do this as soon as possible.
  5. Wear Good Shoes
    I have no idea how other universities are set up, but this one is spread throughout half the city of Durham. For me, personally, I happen to have a college that is furthest away from the university campus (a mile, straight up a very evil hill, in fact), and 90% of my modules/tutorials are a mile the opposite direction from the university. So if you have a day where you have to hit all three spots, you’re in for a fair bit of exercise. But hey–you’ll easily get your 10,000 steps in for the day!
  6. Make Friends Fast
    I’m pretty socially awkward, and even more so being the older, foreign student that everyone assumes is staff. As a result, those crazy kids just don’t want to talk to me. However, I can say that they talk to each other pretty quickly. I have already watched students befriend each other in the halls, and continue to converse and interact (I believe this is how friends are made, but I’m still learning in all this).
    Two minds are better than one, and one of your fellow students may know where and when something is while you’re still trying to figure out if the upstairs of the cafe is for lecturers only. Web out the knowledge–help each other out.
  7. Get Your Student ID Right Away
    There will be some buildings and areas of the university that you can only access with your student ID. Don’t be like me, where you have to sign up for your modules at a specific time, arrive, realize you can’t get in the building, have to walk two miles up hill to your college to get your verification of registration, get lectured for ten minutes, then half to walk a mile back to the university to get the student ID, and then return the initial building another mile down hill to register your modules. Be smart, don’t be like me.
  8. Don’t Bring Lunch
    This isn’t an every-day-of-the-week bit of advice, mind you. But have a look. During some of the days of Induction, there will be the Student Fair, or something else to this nature. Go to it. I know, it’s riddled with people, but trust me. You will get all sorts of random free things. You’ll also find that you can find your societies and clubs to join along the way. I personally joined–wait for it–an on-campus gin club. For this, I got a free shot of gin. As an American, this is somewhat unheard of, so I was quite thrilled.
  9. Don’t Blow Your Student Loans on Booze
    I know! You’re 18! in the UK! which means you can drink. And it’s especially exciting because you’re away from your parents’ watchful eye for the first time, which means they can’t wag their reproving fingers at your liberties. But I promise, the pubs will be there and open all year. No joke. They do not not close after the first week. That means you can save up your drunken nights for three-day weekends, or those Fridays when you’ve just had an insane week and just need to let go! I promise, your liver will thank you. Be good to that slab of organ.
  10. Don’t Get Overwhelmed
    Yeah, there is a lot to do, and a lot going on. You don’t have to go to every single thing. It’s so important that you remember that this is just to help get you familiar with the departments, the campus, and with each other. While you should take advantage of the events going on, don’t forget to take a step back, breathe, and relax. Even if you don’t make it to any of the events, you’ll still be alright. You’ll have to do a little bit of a (more) confused scramble during the first week of lectures, but you will be ok. After all, you got yourself to uni in the first place!

Durham, Durham

Are there any tips I forgot? What was your first pri-uni week of your freshman year like? Let me know in the comments!

 

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