MyHorrorLives.com Blog

A very good friend of mine writes horror. You can find his work in Carpe Nocturne Magazine, HorrorAddicts, and his website. He’s recently expanded from beyond writing horror to compiling a blog. I’d like to share one of his entries, for those of you who are horror movie addicts–feel free to visit his site and argue or agree with him! 

Best Horror Movie Deaths

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Structure Of Reality: The Reliability of the Myth

Structure Of Reality: The Reliability of the Myth

“Culture is shrouded in myth, from the why-so legends of the multitude of Native American tribes to the cultural legends of Norse, Greek, Indian, Egyptians legends. A myth is something created with a grain of truth, a story that contains a principle for why something is. In our modern times, we tell ourselves that we are educated, that we live in a world of science and understanding.”

Hamlet: A Look at A Troubled Mind

So here’s just a little bit of Self Promotion –  I wrote an essay on Hamlet and posted it on HubPages for peer review. Should you be interested in my analysis on Hamlet’s dwindeling sanity, please feel free to check it out (just be warned that it is a series of posts):

Hamlet: An Examination of a Troubled Mind – Part I

WashingtonPost: 7 countries where Americans can study at universities, in English, for free (or almost free)

“What might interest potential university students in the United States is that Germany offers some programs in English — and it’s not the only country. Let’s take a look at the surprising — and very cheap — alternatives to pricey American college degrees.”

Read On To Find Out Which Countries…

Therapy of Daily Journaling

I came across this article, and thought it was wonderful.

I got my first journal when I was 8, and still have it. I wrote in it sparatically, but eventually the habit formed into a daily routine. When things upset me deeply – tramatizing house mates, breakups, and so on – I fall out of the routine. It is only when I begin journaling again that I can pick myself back up again.

I often tell my friends that are going through hardships to keep a journal, or at least to write everything out, even if they burn it afterwards. It has so many theraputic aspects to it, and helps sort out the mind and emotions. Often times I don’t realize what I feel or think until I start putting it to paper. It allows my thoughts to be organized and take that step back to see everything outside of my head.

As a writer I feel it is extrememly important to write daily as well, simply for the exercise, of course.

However, this article outlines other benefits of writing every day for twenty minutes, and they’re more than I could have ever imagined. What’s more, it’s all sciency and the like.

“It turns out writing can make physical wounds heal faster as well. In 2013, New Zealand researchers monitored the recovery of wounds from medically necessary biopsies on 49 healthy adults. The adults wrote about their thoughts and feelings for just 20 minutes, three days in a row, two weeks before the biopsy. Eleven days later, 76% of the group that wrote had fully healed. Fifty-eight percent of the control group had not recovered. The study concluded that writing about distressing events helped participants make sense of the events and reduce distress.”

Read More of “Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Love To Write” Here

The Pen will Help Your Memory

I have been saying this for years and years and years – if you want your writing to be effective – whether the therapeutic purposes of journaling or committing something to memory – you have to write it down the old fashion way: with pen and paper.
Here is an article published on Huffington Post which outlines just why that is:

‘”Study after study suggests that handwriting is important for brain development and cognition,” argued a 2010 article from The Week, citing work from University of Wisconsin psychologist Virginia Berninger, who has tested school-age children and found they tend to generate more ideas when composing essays by hand, rather than on the computer. “Writing entails using the hand and fingers to form letters … the sequential finger movements activate multiple regions of the brain associated with processing and remembering information,” echoed Wade.’

Read More: The Benefits of Writing with Good Old Fashioned Pen and Paper

Huffington Post’s 17 Fascinating Language Facts

As a word smith, I am fascinated by language, either native or otherwise. It is for this reason that I’m considering linguistics along side my English degree. However, here are some beautifully interesting english language facts from the Huffington Post. Numbers 7, 12, and 17 are my favorites!

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5786262?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000063